“Reach Out” to Celebrate National Depression Screening Day

Every year Thursday of the first full week in October is conducted, as an education and National Depression Screening day event by hospitals, clinics, colleges, and community groups nationwide. 

Reach Out

This year’s theme is, “Reach Out”, focusing on connecting with those around you and finding support for yourself and others.

By taking up regular health screening you gain a quick and easy way to spot the first sign of serious illness and opt for professional medical advice.

Screening points out the presence or absence of depressive symptoms and provide a referral for further evaluation if needed. You should see your doctor or a qualified mental health professional if you experience five or more of the symptoms indicated for longer than two weeks or if the symptoms are severe enough to interfere with your daily routine.

Symptoms to Watch Out:

  • A persistent sad, anxious or “empty” mood
  • Sleeping too little, early morning awakening, or sleeping too much
  • Reduced appetite and weight loss, or increased appetite and weight gain
  • Loss of interest or pleasure in activities once enjoyed
  • Restlessness or irritability
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering or making decisions
  • Fatigue or loss of energy
  • Thoughts of death or suicide

For a very long time, depression and anxiety disorders are largely viewed as something to hide. 

Five Ways to Help Manage Depression Symptoms

  • Take back control; by looking at a challenging situation and deciding to move forward in a positive manner.
  • Get adequate sleep: If you are having difficulty sleeping and/or think you might have sleep apnea, consult your doctor.
  • Watch what you eat: Vitamins B12, D, and folate can play a role in alleviating mood disorders, so it’s vital to get adequate amounts.
  • Exercise regularlyExercise reduces depression, negative moods, and anxiety, while improving cognitive functioning and self-esteem.
  • Alternative therapies like acupuncture and meditation.

This day provides communities an opportunity to come together to learn about depression together. All of this helps fight the negative stigma surrounding depression.

Disclaimer

The Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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